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English
Where do you think all the money goes?
Portuguese
Paraondeachasquetodoodinheirovai?
Female voice
Male voice
0 months ago
Issue resolved
Spelling mistake: achsa = achas
Reply
Reply
0 months ago
Thank you for pointing out the typo! :-)
English
I knew that you'd need to do that
Portuguese
Eusabiaqueprecisariasfazerisso
Female voice
Male voice
0 months ago
Issue resolved
I think 'precisarias de' should be accepted.
Reply
Reply
0 months ago
Hi estret! Thank you for your question. You're right - both forms are correct and should be accepted. Please note, however, that "precisarias fazer" is the norm in Brazilian Portuguese, while "precisarias de fazer" is mostly used in European Portuguese (even though both forms are correct in European Portuguese).
English
Do you agree?
Portuguese
Estásdeacordo?
Female voice
Male voice
0 months ago
Issue resolved
Hi,

What is the difference between " Estas de acordo" & Estas de concordo??
Reply
Reply
0 months ago
Hi Kiran. Thank you for your question! There a few possible options for this card.
European Portuguese: "Estás de acordo?", "Concordas?" (tu)
Brazilian Portuguese: "Você está de acordo?", "Você concorda?" (você)

Regarding your question, only "Estás de acordo?" is correct.
"concordo" is a present tense conjugation of the verb "concordar" (to agree) - "Eu concordo" (I agree).
English
What's up?
Portuguese
Eaí?
Female voice
Male voice
0 months ago
Issue resolved
I think "E aí?" means "What about there" or "How about there", not "What's up?"
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Reply
0 months ago
no it also means "whats up" lmaoo it's a slang that we pt speakers use
0 months ago
"E aí" means "What's up".
0 months ago
Hi Christian87! Thank you for your question. You're partially correct. "E aí?" can definitely mean "What about there?", especially in European Portuguese. However, it also means "What's up?", and it's often used as an informal greeting in Brazilian Portuguese.

- E aí? Tudo bom? (What's up? How's it going?)
vs.
- Onde devemos colocar a mesa? Ela não cabe aqui. (Where should we place the table? It doesn't fit here.)
- E aí? Cabe? (What about there? Does it fit?)
English
What are you?
Portuguese
Oqueéstu?
Female voice
Male voice
0 months ago
Issue resolved
"O que você é"
Can we also use above for same? What is differences, both are same correct
Reply
Reply
0 months ago
yes, you can. European Portuguese is very formal. while Brazilian Portuguese isn't as so.
0 months ago
Thank you for your question, Kiran! Yes, you can definitely use "O que você é?" (Brazilian Portuguese) vs. "O que és tu?" (European Portuguese). Please remember that there's a significant difference between Portuguese spoken in Brazil and Portugal, which is the use of the pronouns *você* and *tu*. Both mean the 2nd person singular (you). In Brazil, "tu" is not as common; "você" is used more often.
English
Bench
Portuguese
Banco
Female voice
Male voice
0 months ago
Bench and stool both translate as banco in this module. In English they are clearly different. If there is a bench next to a stool, how does on differentiate between them in Portuguese?

In addition to this banco also translates to bank.
Reply
Reply
0 months ago
there's multiple different translations depending on the context, im unsure of what level of pt you are- so if your a beginner be ready because it'll get a little challenging as you progress.
English
Where?
Portuguese
Onde?
Female voice
Male voice
0 months ago
Issue resolved
it's not that difficult
não é tão difícil
Reply
Reply

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